Tips For Everest Base Camp Trek

(x0)  | By: Glorious Himalaya Trekking Pvt. Ltd. Ganesh Bdr. Gurung | 751 Views | 0 Replies

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The physical structure of Mt. Everest has captivated adventurous men and women from all over the world since 1920s, and the people like Sir Edmund Hillary, and Tenzing have popularized it broadly by ascending its ummit in 1953. This is the mountain where many people have lost their life, and this is also the mountain where many people have reached its ummit successfully to make a record.

Reaching the summit of Everest may be impossible, but reaching its base camp is possible becuase there is a route which is safe, and where 37000 people walked in 2012. Since then, the number of Everest trekkers has been increasing.

What's it like trekking to Everest base camp?

Besides breathtaking scenery, you will experience unique Sherpa culture, visit monasteries and museums. Aslo, you will enjoy your  days completely. You also pass by colorful prayer wheel and walk on swinging bridges, and these seem to be straight out from the movie called Indiana Jones, while in the evenings, you are served hot food and have a time for conservation with like-minded trekkers around the fire in a dining room.

When should i make the trek?

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From March to June and from September to December is the best time to do Everest base camp trek.

Can I trek without guide?

A guide is mandatory. Hiring of a guide is compulsory after the disappearance of a Belgian trekkers in June 2012. For US $20-$30 a day, you can also learn plenty about the local culture and natural environment form his or her.

How do I get in shape?

Prepare by cycling, swimming, hill climbing and do a lot of walking if you have a time. Walk five-hours once a week, three months before starting Everest Base Camp Trek. Seek out hills or find a tall building and repeatedly walk up and down the stairs.

What are the essential backpacks gears for EBC Trek?

  • A fleece jacket
  • Down jacket
  • Thermal underwear
  • Two pairs of long pants,
  • Two or three T-shirts
  • broken-in boots
  • Trekking socks
  • Sneakers or sandals for evenings
  • Raincoat, gloves
  • Woolen hat
  • Sunhat
  • Polarized sunglasses
  • A good sleeping bag (rated to -20°C/0°F) is essential; if it’s winter, a thermal liner makes it extra toasty.
  • Opt for travel-size toiletries
  • Sunscreen
  • Lip balm
  • travel towel and tissues
  • Baby wipes
  • Medication for diarrhea
  • Antibiotics for a chest or sinus infection
  • Adhesive bandages for blisters
  • Use two 1L water bottles
  • Water purification tablets

How can I Trek safely?

Hike slowly and easily. Altitude sickness can affect anybody – even the extremely fit person. (Usually, you will acclimatize at Namche and Dingboche) Symptoms of altitude mountain sickness are headaches, dizziness, sleeplessness, loss of appetite and breathlessness. Diamox is used for treatment, but if symptoms persist, descend downhill.

Eat veg foods. As tempting as it is to try a juicy yak steak or ‘buff burger’, be aware that all meat is carried up by porters from Lukla due to the no-killing policy in the Sagamartha National Park, so by the time you have it, it is not that fresh. The safest, healthiest option is to eat dal bhat (lentil soup and rice) – it is fresh and is a great source of protein and energy. As the Nepali saying goes like this, ‘Dal bhat’ power equals 24 hour energy.

Do I need to hire porter?

It is great to use a porter. When you use a porter, you give someone a job. But you need to treat your porter well. This means following the International Porter Protection Group (IPPG) guidelines. It consists of making sure that your porter is well-equipped, doesn’t carry more than 30kg, has insurance and receives the same medical care that you receive.

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